taking policy to the
smart connected device

Posts Tagged ‘Broadband data consumption’

Mobile Tethering is a Fact of Life. Plan for it and charge for it

Written by GoS on . Posted in Blog

Until recently, there has been a range of contrasting positions to the growing phenomenon of mobile tethering. Some MNOs have been resolutely opposed to the practice, while others have steadfastly ignored it. However, new research by Analysys Mason suggests that it’s time to formalise arrangements and convert tethering to a revenue opportunity.

According to Analysys Mason, 37% of users in a number of key markets have used mobile tethering at least once. However, the percentage is higher among those users with tablet devices. Rather than using mobile broadband packages to obtain connectivity for tablets, users are instead opting either to use Wi-Fi or else connect via tethering to their smartphone.

The conclusion from the research is that MNOs need to consider including tethering options for multiple devices in their smartphone data packages and to capture revenue for them. While dongle-enabled mobile broadband for laptops remains popular, increasingly users will shift to tablets, which in turn, means that they will need more connectivity. Introducing flexible, multi-device packages for smartphone users will help meet this need.

What this means is that MNOs will need to be able to manage connectivity better. They may want to charge for this capability via the delivery of flexible and dynamic policies. Alternatively, they may seek to incorporate it into existing plans and simply to manage the experience. In either case, MNOs will need the ability to adjust network conditions to optimise the experience for applications accessed while tethering.

MNOs need a reliable way to identify mobile tethering and to deliver their chosen policy. Since tethering is activated on the mobile device, the ability to recognise tethering could enable the support of additional services, such as the dynamic selection of best available network. They will need to take advantage of Policy on the Device (PoD) solutions to deliver a range of tethering policies and to cope with an increasing range of devices that connect indirectly to the network via mobile broadband.

The solution is to deploy GoS 360°. This consists of two elements, the GoS Agent and the GoS Manager. GoS Agent resides on the handset and can determine when tethering has been activated and report this, via the GoS Manager, to the PCRF across the Gx interface. Once a tethering session has been identified, the MNO can implement its chosen policy.

The GoS solution enables MNOs to manage tethering according to the range of policies they offer customers. This means that they can more easily combine tethering with other, complementary services, such as dynamic network selection and WiFi offload. Why not contact us to find out more?

Extending the CDN – How Policy on Smart Devices Can Enable Telcos to Add Value

Written by GoS on . Posted in Blog

Speakers at the recent Mobile Video Optimisation event in Berlin agreed that the mobile cell is the next critical area for delivering high quality video services. At this point in the mobile network, the lowest common denominator rules. And yet, analysts are united in their predictions that mobile video consumption will enjoy spectacular growth – the only debate concerns the rate.

But if this growth is to be enjoyed with the quality of experience levels demanded by users, the network has to evolve to cope. At present, OTT video providers either leverage their own CDNs or form partnerships with specialist providers. Telcos that are entering the fray are building their own ‘telco CDNs’ or partnering with other providers. The point of the CDN is to bring content closer to the user, to reduce traffic across the network or the complexities of server connectivity. This is fine as far as it goes, but it still leaves the delivery subject to the conditions in the last mile or in the RAN.

There are a number of ways in which content delivery can be optimised for users in the RAN. One such that has attracted considerable attention is WiFi offload – many mobile subscribers automatically connect to WiFi networks as soon as they find one and MNOs can leverage this in several ways. By offloading bulk data delivery to WiFi networks, MNOs can save costs and, where the WiFi network offers a higher bandwidth connection than is available in the RAN, they can deliver a better user experience.

There are also moves afoot to bring content servers directly to the base stations as well as proposals to implement caching on user devices so that content can be delivered more economically, intelligently and efficiently. Such an approach can provide optimised pre-loading of user targeted content (either through promotions tied to analysis of viewer behaviour and viewing patterns) or based on explicit preferences that are expressed by the user. Either way, off-peak delivery and use of WiFi networks can be leveraged to reduce content delivery costs.

Extending policy enforcement and monitoring to smart devices enables policies to be established to enhance user experience where they are needed – on user devices where content is actually experienced – while, at the same time, remaining fully integrated with the overall network policy control and analytics framework. Although this remains some way off, there’s no question that smart devices will have a crucial role to play in managing video content delivery and optimising the user experience.

Given the growth forecast for video traffic and despite advances in network coverage and bandwidth due to the rollout of LTE, technologies such as adaptive bitrate codecs and high definition video present challenges. Adaptive bitrate is, by definition, unpredictable and MNOs cannot easily predict consumption. It’s even more difficult with capped mobile data plans, as the user may not be aware that changes to the codec may consume more of their allowance mid-session. However, this opens up the potential for increased dynamic control of bearer connections for real-time content delivery and increased bandwidth on a per session or mid-session basis. If more bandwidth is required for HD, then mechanisms need to be in place to provide such capacity and to inform the user if this has an impact on their data plans. This can be achieved more effectively and efficiently once policy monitoring and enforcement is available on smart devices.

Extending policy control functions to devices is essential in a world in which video traffic dominates mobile data consumption. Local caching will depend on close integration with policy engines to control delivery, charging and consumption monitoring – as well as quality. MNOs need to consider how to address this issue now to plan for the growth in consumption so that they pre-empt these issues. As has been proven time and time again with migrations to higher-bandwidth technologies, once LTE is available, users will find ways to consume more data – and MNOs need to be ready to support this at all levels.

Of course, MNOs will capitalise on such measures, but they also present opportunities to forge partnerships with other CDN providers. Since telcos and MNOs effectively dominate in the last mile (or cell), they are uniquely placed to provide solutions that can help CDNs as mobile video consumption gathers pace.

Why not talk to GoS Networks and find out how integrating policy enforcement and monitoring to smart devices can help manage and enhance the mobile video experience?

Independent Trials show GoS 360° Solution Significantly Reduces RAN Signaling Load

Written by GoS on . Posted in Blog

The GoS 360° Solution has been subjected to a range of tests by Ingenia Telecom, in conjunction with a leading mobile operator. The results demonstrate that the GoS 360° Solution significantly reduces signaling load in the RAN and promotes RNC load-friendly behavior. The results were presented at the recent IEEE Communications Quality and Reliability Workshop in front of an audience of industry and academic representatives.

The testing proved that, when compared with over configurations, the device with GoS installed performed the lowest number of Radio Bearer reconfigurations and remained in low energy states for longer periods of time. Depending on the configuration of the mobile network, this strongly suggests that the GoS 360° Agent has a positive effect on battery duration and life expectancy.

Reducing signaling load and radio resource consumption and transitions has important consequences for user experience and network capacity planning. As has been demonstrated in live deployments, the GoS 360° solution can help MNOs significantly reduce CAPEX and positively impact user experience. The independent analysis also indicated that GoS 360° is compatible with other solutions and can provide significant benefits when deployed alongside them.

A summary of the methodology used, the tests and the results is now available. It can be downloaded here.