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Posts Tagged ‘Cisco Visual Networking Index’

With GoS, Mobile Network Operators can defer CAPEX investment in bandwidth and capacity by up to 9 months

Written by GoS on . Posted in Blog

Streaming video is an application that is experiencing strong growth from mobile users, but it can cause significant downstream congestion when downloading takes place at the maximum possible bandwidth.

It is often assumed that to achieve appropriate levels of customer satisfaction for streaming video it is essential to maintain maximum download rates at all times. However, independent experiments undertaken by GoS Networks have shown that customer experience is actually unaffected if the maximum download rate is constrained to about 1.25x the rate of consumption. Since the maximum download rate can be anything up to 16 times the minimum required, this represents a substantial saving. A typical streaming rate is 440kbps, so 660kbps is more than adequate to prevent playout pauses. Restricting a video download to this rate – rather than the full HSDPA rate of 7.2Mbps – reduces the peak bandwidth consumed by video downloads by a factor of more than 10.

Estimates by Cisco and others suggest that half of all traffic in mobile networks is derived from video delivered to mobile broadband clients, so applying GoS in this case could reduce the overall peak by nearly 50%, which is equivalent to 9.5 months traffic growth at current rates, estimated at 108% CAGR (Cisco, 2010).

For MNOs faced with pressure on CAPEX budgets, being able to gracefully manage network enhancements and plan with more granularity can be a significant benefit. This can be achieved by deploying GoS in mobile devices and dongles to actively manage download services by restricting download rates while ensuring fair access to available services and resources.

Meet with us at MWC to learn more.

More on mobile data growth – video to account for 52% by end of 2011

Written by GoS on . Posted in Blog

It’s the report everyone’s talking about. See broadband genie’s take on it here.

Cisco’s Visual Networking Index points to the rise in video traffic as the main source of the huge growth in mobile data traffic. Cisco estimates that at its current rate, internet video usage levels will reach 52.8 per cent of all data traffic used by then end of this year!!

It is often assumed that to achieve appropriate levels of customer satisfaction for streaming video it is essential to maintain maximum download rates at all times. However, independent experiments undertaken by GoS Networks have shown that customer experience is actually unaffected if the maximum download rate is constrained to about 1.25x the rate of consumption. Since the maximum download rate can be anything up to 16 times the minimum required, this represents a substantial saving. A typical streaming rate is 440kbps, so 660kbps is more than adequate to prevent playout pauses. Restricting a video download to this rate – rather than the full HSDPA rate of 7.2Mbps – reduces the peak bandwidth consumed by video downloads by a factor of more than 10. Estimates by Cisco and others suggest that half of all traffic in mobile networks is derived from video delivered to mobile broadband clients, so applying GoS in this case could reduce the overall peak by nearly 50%, which is equivalent to 9.5 months traffic growth at current rates, estimated at 108% CAGR (Cisco, 2010).

Cisco Visual Networking Index

Written by GoS on . Posted in Blog

Cisco Visual Networking Index: Global Bandwidth Goes Stratospheric!

Many readers will have seen the dramatic forecast made by Cisco regarding IP video traffic demand and consumption. If not, you can read it here. It’s well worth it, for it tells a fascinating story. It contains many interesting statistics, but the most topical (for us) concern video. Not only is video traffic growing rapidly, but it will become the dominant form of consumer internet traffic by 2014. Of course, video traffic is comprised of many sources – TV, Video on Demand, Internet and P2P). Only some of these demand real-time capabilities and real-time capabilities of course have stringent QoS demands.

In fact, Cisco forecast that in consumer markets, real-time video traffic, such as Internet TV and video communications will experience extremely rapid growth – up to sevenfold in the case of video communications. If these forecasts are accurate, this is going to cause significant problems for service providers.

Real-time traffic needs guarantees of service for it to be delivered in a timely manner and for an acceptable quality of experience to be achieved. If the right level of QoE isn’t achieved, consumer subscribers will start to look for service providers who can deliver it. QoS will therefore become a selling tool – another differentiator in the drive to win and retain customers.

And this matters, because subscriber acquisition costs remain high, so if poor QoS results in churn, it’s going to cost a great deal more to win subscribers back, particularly if reputation begins to suffer. Make no mistake about it, QoS will become a key element in the subscriber value proposition. In the early stages of this traffic boom, it will be a clear differentiator, but ultimately it will become a basic requirement. Either way, its importance cannot be underestimated. Whereas in the past, the solution has been to increase capacity, it’s simply not going to be economically sustainable to do so in the future. Investment in bandwidth will have to be matched with investment in QoS solutions to ensure that it is deployed and used efficiently. Quite simply, QoS will be essential to the goal of profitable revenue growth.

Service providers need to adopt an appropriate QoS architecture to be able to monitor and enforce quality of service across their networks – and to deliver the appropriate QoE to their customers. This is not trivial – in addition to core network engineering and policies, service providers need a way to deliver QoS right to the edge of the network, the boundary between individual subscribers and the access domain. This is where GoS comes in – it’s the missing link in the QoS chain, enabling service providers to monitor and enforce QoS even at the network boundary. You can learn how here.